'A Short History of Photography' 
12 April 2016   

The club welcomed Sid Jones, a member of Dorchester Camera club who gave members an interesting illustrated talk on the history of photography from the early attempts up to some 20th century icons who were pioneers of the photography we enjoy today.
Joseph Nicephore Niepce made the first photographic image with a camera obscura. Heliographs or sun prints as they were called were the prototype for the modern photograph, by letting light draw the picture.

In the mid 19th century Louis Daguerre, a French artist and photographer was recognized for his invention of the daguerreotype process of photography. He became known as one of the fathers of photography.

The metal-based daguerreotype process soon had some competition from Henry Fox Talbot who created permanent (negative) images using paper soaked in silver chloride and fixed with a salt solution. Talbot created positive images by contact printing onto another sheet of paper which meant he could duplicate the images and he patented his process under the name "calotype".

At first long exposures were needed but by 1845 exposures were down to 2 minutes allowing studio portraits to be created as long as the sitter did not move. Painters and artists thought they would be put out of business by the invention.

Although early photographers had to transport heavy cameras and tripods over often difficult terrain images of faraway places were seen for the first time 

Queen Victoria became interested in this new process and even had a go herself. Soon photography became popular with the gentry and in 1890 the invention of the Box Brownie brought photography to the masses.
Faster shutter speeds meant photographers could capture action.

Although even then photographs were not always what they seemed as several images could be stitched together.

After the break Sid showed images taken by his favourite 20th century photographers including Ansel Adams who in 1981 said 'I believe the electronic image will be the next major advance' and that turned out to be so right. Adams images had a superb quality of light and he experimented with early colour which very quickly improved to give stunning landscape images.

Members enjoyed seeing images by Henri Cartier-bresson, Edward Weston, Eliot Erwill and Denis Thorne and others. Many images have become famous classics still very much admired today.
Thank you Sid for giving such an informative talk.

'In Isolation' Set Subject Competition
5 April 2016   

SeatOur final open competition of the season on the theme of ‘In Isolation' proved to be a well-supported and fascinating competition on many different levels. Firstly, having narrowly being beaten by the gents in last week's Battles the ladies shone through and took most of the leading places in each competition category (Beginners, Intermediates and Advanced). Secondly, it was fascinating to observe how the advanced photographers interpreted isolation compared with the less experienced photographers. In the main the advanced photographers tended to view isolation in terms of photographing an object separated from its environment. On the other hand the less experienced photographers (with some exceptions) tended to interpret isolation as something 'within the person’.Despair 

As a result we saw a lot of lone trees contrasting with images of people or situations where there was a conscious attempt to convey feelings of abandonment and separation. The choice it seemed was whether to photograph something alone or something that was lonely.  Both approaches in their own way exemplified emotion and storytelling, and resulted in some excellent well thought images.

The competition was ably judged by Les Loosemore ARPS, AWPF, DPAGB, who travelled from South Wales to be with us. 
Although he was clearly impressed with the standard of imagery where necessary he offered suggestions for improvement in a helpful way. In particular he was impressed with the clever use of vertical letterbox type images, and the way some chose to use silhouettes to emphasis separation.
He did suggest however that some other images did not look their best because they were, perhaps unavoidably, photographed at the wrong time of the day when the light was harsh and unflattering. A consistent theme of the evening was the need to avoid distracting highlights particularly at the edges of the image, and not to be shy of cropping.

Alone

In the Beginners section there was a rich variety of very well taken pictures which augers well for next season. In third place was  'Stonechat' by David Wilkinson.  In second place was 'Pattens' by Kyra Wilson, and in first place a striking but simple image titled 'Seat with a View’ above left also by Kyra taken on a white ship down a passage way with contrasting blue sea and sky providing the perfect frame.   

In the Intermediate section third place went to Gill Ford Pier with an image of a lone tree in sunnier climes. Second place also went to Gill with an image of lone boat 'Long Way from Home’. In first place was ' Despair' right a mono image by Caroline Wright of a man drinking alone with head in his hands. All of us present I think could identify with his despair even though very little of his face was shown.

In the Advanced section 12 images were selected for commendation. First place was awarded to Pam Mullings with a rather sad picture of a dishevelled young boy ‘Left All Alone'. left Second place was awarded to Gill Cardy FRPS DPAGB AFIAP for 'Lone Tree in Snow' which perfectly captured the different textures in the snow. Third place went to Pam with picture of a lone Waterbuck standing in reflected water and looking straight at the camera.  

Congratulations to all those who took part.
We are grateful to Les for his considered approach, his constructive comments and consistent judging.    Diolch yn fawr!    MB (Our Welsh corrospondant)                               

                                   


Ladies V Gents - a win for the Gents

29 March 2016   

It’s been sometime since the club held a Ladies v Gents competitionripples but when Battle Secretary Jean Ingram challenged the men to a battle few of us could resist. Jean unfortunately had to resign from the position but Pam Mullings took over and organised the 'Battle'
To avoid any risk of gender bias the competition was ably judged by Eddy and Pam Lane (both ARPS DPAGB EFIAP) each of whom could award up to 10 marks which were combined to give marks out of 20.
It was a condition of the competition that at least 50% images had to be selected from the Beginners and Intermediate competition groups.
red foxThe ladies team captained by Pam had chosen a wide range of images including 3 architectural, 8 landscapes, 9 nature and 5 portraits. Amongst their 30 images there were also 5 monos.
Included were images from 6 ladies from the Beginners section who only joined the club this season - 2 of whom had never entered a competition before.

The Gents team captained by Michael Barnes chose 2 creative, 12 landscapes, 7 nature including 5 flowers/fungi, and 2 portraits.
They also included 2 monos. 

It was not clear whether this difference in approach was down to strategy or to gender bias. 0058

What was apparent however that was if you viewed each image on its own merits it would have been extremely difficult to determine whether it had been taken by a lady or by a gent. 

The competition itself proved to be very close with the lead changing hands at different times.

During the evening several images were awarded the maximum 10 points by one or other of the judges.
Five participants were awarded 10 points by both judges including Gill Cardy FRPS DPAGB AFIAP whose image of a red fox in snow (top left) was chosen a by Pam Lane as ‘image of the evening’,
Ripples Everywhere (top right) by Michael Barnes

which Eddy Lane selected as his 'image of the evening'. 
Also awarded 20 marks were Lynda Rugg (Golden Light)  right,
Richard Watson LRPS (Squirrels Leap) below
Robert Harvey ARPS EFIAP (Three Galaxies) bottom right 3galaxies

leaping
Ultimately the Gents came out on top securing 509 points to the Ladies 496 


We are grateful to our joint judges Pam and Eddy and for ensuring that, above all else, the evening was fun. We are grateful to the team captains for collating their team’s images, and to all those who took part. We are also especially grateful to Jean for suggesting the idea and wish her a speedy and full recovery. 


All in all a very good club night. We must do it again sometime soon! MB          
            

Club News articles from 2014 to March 2016

September 2015 - March 2016 pdf.  September 2014 - May 2015 pdf. September 2013 - September 2014 to follow
September2012 - September 2013 - to follow


September 2011 - September 2013 - to follow

 

 

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